In Rehearsal

Akiva is exposed. Alison Vodnoy’s character starts the show before it starts by appearing on stage dressed in the layers of clothing from each of the loves of her past. She ritualistically peels off each layer until she is nothing but herself in the form of a dancer.

Act one of the piece is Akiva making her case for why she hasn’t found the right person to love, going through her lovers one by one, tearing them down piece by piece, with a hilariously soft viciousness. She faces challenges from her Psychiatrist and opens the door to her own faults.


Akiva is exposed. Alison Vodnoy’s character starts the show before it starts by appearing on stage dressed in the layers of clothing from each of the loves of her past. She ritualistically peels off each layer until she is nothing but herself in the form of a dancer.

Act one of the piece is Akiva making her case for why she hasn’t found the right person to love, going through her lovers one by one, tearing them down piece by piece, with a hilariously soft viciousness. She faces challenges from her Psychiatrist and opens the door to her own faults.

Act two is a rebuttal for the defense, where Vodnoy portrays all of Akiva’s former lovers who proceed to illustrate their flaws, but make clear Akiva’s many imperfections.

Vodnoy has Akiva’s soul mixed with her own. The character is a very personal one and each similar and difference with Vodnoy’s own life is a consious choice. The use of dance movement a linkage to Akiva’s dialog augments each word. The portrayal of Akiva’s lovers is also well done, but a couple of them are almost so one dimensional, they aren’t worth mentioning at all. Vodnoy as the 32 old married man was a stand out from the second act.

I was hoping for a different ending, but it resolves itself authentically. Vodnoy will be taking this show on the road to the Fringe Festivals in Minneapolis and Indianapolis this Summer.

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