Fringe Review: Girlfight

First and foremost, I did not write this play. It would be rather strange to review my own play. Its odd enough that I share the name of the playwright that seeing my name in the program provides what maybe someday will be a farcical element to another play.


First and foremost, I did not write this play. It would be rather strange to review my own play. Its odd enough that I share the name of the playwright that seeing my name in the program provides what maybe someday will be a farcical element to another play.

With “my” name in program it was befuddling when asked about it, but to the disappointment of some of my friends, I’ve not the ability (at least not yet) to pen a composition of this quality. Brian Andrews-Griffin had such an honor and I’ll take the liberty to speak for him in saying that most of the honor goes to the four on the stage and the director (another Brian) Brian Robertson.

The Physicallity of this play gives a funny tone to the upstream motion of the play as it starts at the end and tells the story of three women who cross paths at a flower show where all three see an Owl in the daytime, believed to give good luck. Two of the three (the fighters Regina Pugh and Aretta Baumgartner) are self-absorbed with their own plight and material gain. They fight over the good luck. They see it as something they can own, and blame the other for their run of bad luck. They are the obsessed with each other. The third woman, played by Jodie Linver, has lost her husband at a young age. She’s introspective on life, but not her own, of her husband’s. In the end, the third woman has the good luck to two fighters battle over.

I was very impressed with this Performance Gallery production in their ability to use the time reversal and physical motion (almost cartoon like) as the source of much of the humor, but not in a clumsy over barring manner.

I saw “girlfight” the same day as I saw Le Petomane Theatre Ensemble’s “Public Espionage.” Both productions were part of what was billed a “CoolAberration” where each play incorporated 10 elements into each production. I think I come with some of them, but I am not sure: Rolling on the ground, Running/Chasing people, Man wearing a mask, Singing, playing a string instrument, bubbles, discussing killing people. Other than those, I missed the rest. If you want to incorporate this exercise, I suggest seeing both on the same day, which takes place Saturday June 9th. Get your tickets now!

UPDATE: I forgot the tongs!

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